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CIRCLE K--I FOUND THIS VERY INTERESTING

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importuser

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CIRCLE K--I FOUND THIS VERY INTERESTING

By importuser at 10/3/2007 2:34 PM

Posted by:carsnfrd
CIRCLE K: THE BEGINNING

In 1936 Jay N. Emerson, a member of the Pullman Washington Kiwanis Club, presented a plan to his club proposing that the Pullman Kiwanis Club purchase a house that could be rented to young men in need of assistance to attend the local college. The plan became a reality as the Kiwanians established the "Circle K House" at Washington State College. For ten years the "Circle K House" became affiliated with a Greek letter organization, although it continued to be sponsored by the Pullman Kiwanis Club.

Eleven years later in 1947, Donald T. Forsythe, Trustee of Kiwanis International, aided in transitioning Circle K from a fraternity to a service-oriented organization. That year, during September, [b]the first Circle K club similar to our present day organization, was chartered at Carthage College in Carthage, Illinois.[/b] (The college moved to its present-day location of Kenosha, Wisconsin in 1962.)

As Circle K's structure adapted from being a fraternity, its purpose also changed. The organization established the following objectives:

To provide an opportunity for capable, ambitious, and worthy young men to acquire a college education by assisting them, where necessary, with their financial problems; by means of a scholarship fund, if available, or securing part-time employment.
To afford members a useful training in the social graces and the development of a well-rounded personality.
To promote good fellowship and high scholarship within the group.
To develop in the members a thinking and aggressive citizenship and the Kiwanis spirit of service for the improvement of all human relationships on the campus, in the community, state, and nation.
To aid the growth and development of other Circle K Clubs.
Circle K began as one man's dream to enable the success of local collegians and continued to grow as others began to believe in the concepts of Circle K and in the men who belonged to Circle K. Though Jay N. Emerson died June 12, 1947, before he could his dream become a reality, his vision of a collegiate-level, international youth organization will live on forever.

CIRCLE K: TRANSITIONING FROM A FRATERNITY

To emphasize the advantages of the American way of life.
To provide educational opportunities for worthy young men.
To encourage participation in group activities.
To promote good fellowship and high scholarship.
To develop aggressive citizenship and the spirit of service for the improvement of all human relationships.
To afford useful training in the social graces and personality development.
To encourage and promote the following ideals:
To give primacy to the human and spiritual rather than to the material values of life.
To encourage the daily living of the Golden Rule in all human relationships.
To promote the adoption and the application of higher social, business, and professional standards.
To develop, by precept and example, a more intelligent, aggressive and serviceable citizenship.
To provide through Circle K Clubs, a practical means to form enduring friendships, to render altruistic service, and to build better communities.
To cooperate in creating and maintaining that sound public opinion and high idealism which make possible the increase of righteousness, justice, and patriotism and good will.
The motto of the organization became the same as that of Kiwanis International:  "We Build."

By 1953, Circle K clubs were located at 57 different (upper level) institutions with a total membership of 1,425. During this time, discussion over the possible

For two years, the Carthage College Circle K Club existed alone. But on March 26, 1949, the University of Western Ontario became the second Circle K Club to charter. Carthage College and the University of Western Ontario were soon joined by the Louisiana Polytechnic Institute on May 13, 1949. Circle K gained momentum and grew rapidly throughout the United States; sixteen more clubs chartered in 1950.

With the formation of Circle K clubs, Kiwanis International established a Special Committee on Circle K Clubs in 1952. [b]Andy Hodges of Carthage, Illinois, was appointed chairman of the committee. [/b] The committee brought about following changes in the objectives of Circle K:

formation of an International Circle K organization began to increase. Chairman Hodges was able to arrange a meeting at the 1953 Kiwanis International Convention to discuss the formation of an International organization and to elect temporary officers for Circle K International.

Twenty-five Circle K members, representing fifteen clubs, along with several Kiwanis International Board members met June 22-24, 1953. At the end of the meeting, Kenneth B. Creasy from Ohio Wesleyan University emerged as the first President of Circle K. A full board, consisting of a Vice President, Executive Secretary/Treasurer, and eleven Trustees, was also elected to serve as the temporary officers of Circle K.

Although Circle K was moving closer to attaining International status, Circle K primarily remained a local Kiwanis activity at the urging of J. Frank McCabe, the Director of Key Club International. McCabe also handled the Circle K procedures a the Chicago General Office of Kiwanis International. His conservative stance allowed Circle K to develop a definite sense of direction and contributed greatly to a strong base of support from Kiwanis before becoming an International organization.

At the Kiwanis International Convention, held during May of 1954, an attempt was made by the Kiwanis Special Committee on Circle K Clubs to help Circle K gain recognition as an International organization. The attempt failed. However, a temporary Circle K organization was established as Circle K members prepared themselves for [b]their first annual convention which was held October 17-19, 1954, at Carthage College. [/b]
[b]One-hundred and fourteen members, representing 35 Circle K Clubs, attended the convention.[/b] After the elections, Eugene C. Alford, Jr., from Georgia Institute of Technology, was elected the second President of Circle K.

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Re: CIRCLE K--I FOUND THIS VERY INTERESTING

By importuser at 9/5/2008 1:19 PM

Posted by:carsnfrd
[b]THIS IS MY ROUGH DRAFT TO SEND TO THE PRESIDENT OF CIRCLE K INTERNATIONAL AND THE EASTERN IOWA/ILLINOIS REGION HEAD--PLEASE BE MY ENGLISH TEACHER AND GET OUT THE RED PEN BEFORE I SEND THE FINISHED PRODUCT.
THANKS
ROB
SEPTEMBER 5TH 2008[/b]
Good Morning,
I have some very exciting news to share with you all. The former Carthage College campus in Carthage Illinois has sat dormant for the past 17 years. Prairieland Investment Group (PIG), a group of swine veterinarians and producers, recently purchased the campus and are in the process of revitalizing a number of the campus buildings for use as their corporate headquarters, associate office space and temporary living quarters.
One of the most prominent buildings on the campus is the Bryan Auditorium. It is a 700 seat facility that has served the college and the community since it was built in the early 50's. In fact, Circle K members prepared themselves for their first annual convention which was held October 17-19, 1954, at Carthage College in this very building.   PIG (I love this abbr.!) is proposing to donate this auditorium to Carl Sandburg College, our local Junior College, so that it may once again be revitalized as the center of the community for education, the arts, and public gatherings. This grand building is the reason for my excitement and this email!   I am pleased  to chair a committee to champion the capital campaign to renovate this facility. Although we are in the very early stages of this project, I wanted to personally ask your organization, with your very strong ties to this building and community to consider being a major partner in this project.
The are many possibilities to honor the birthplace of Circle K  and I am looking forward to discussing them further with your fine organization. Please do not hesitate to give me a call or send me an email with your thoughts, questions, or ideas! I hope that you are as excited about this project  as I am.
Sincerely,
Rob Carson
Carson Motors
Ford/Chevy/Buick/Pontiac
Carthage and Hamilton
Illinois
1-800-728-3589
carsnfrd@adams.net

I have enclosed some information about the history of Circle K and the new project!


In 1936 Jay N. Emerson, a member of the Pullman Washington Kiwanis Club, presented a plan to his club proposing that the Pullman Kiwanis Club purchase a house that could be rented to young men in need of assistance to attend the local college. The plan became a reality as the Kiwanians established the "Circle K House" at Washington State College. For ten years the "Circle K House" became affiliated with a Greek letter organization, although it continued to be sponsored by the Pullman Kiwanis Club.
Eleven years later in 1947, Donald T. Forsythe, Trustee of Kiwanis International, aided in transitioning Circle K from a fraternity to a service-oriented organization. That year, during September, the first Circle K club similar to our present day organization, was chartered at Carthage College in Carthage, Illinois. (The college moved to its present-day location of Kenosha, Wisconsin in 1962.)

As Circle K's structure adapted from being a fraternity, its purpose also changed. The organization established the following objectives:

To provide an opportunity for capable, ambitious, and worthy young men to acquire a college education by assisting them, where necessary, with their financial problems; by means of a scholarship fund, if available, or securing part-time employment.
To afford members a useful training in the social graces and the development of a well-rounded personality.
To promote good fellowship and high scholarship within the group.
To develop in the members a thinking and aggressive citizenship and the Kiwanis spirit of service for the improvement of all human relationships on the campus, in the community, state, and nation.
To aid the growth and development of other Circle K Clubs.
Circle K began as one man's dream to enable the success of local collegians and continued to grow as others began to believe in the concepts of Circle K and in the men who belonged to Circle K. Though Jay N. Emerson died June 12, 1947, before he could his dream become a reality, his vision of a collegiate-level, international youth organization will live on forever.

CIRCLE K: TRANSITIONING FROM A FRATERNITY

For two years, the Carthage College Circle K Club existed alone. But on March 26, 1949, the University of Western Ontario became the second Circle K Club to charter. Carthage College and the University of Western Ontario were soon joined by the Louisiana Polytechnic Institute on May 13, 1949. Circle K gained momentum and grew rapidly throughout the United States; sixteen more clubs chartered in 1950.

With the formation of Circle K clubs, Kiwanis International established a Special Committee on Circle K Clubs in 1952. Andy Hodges of Carthage, Illinois, was appointed chairman of the committee. The committee brought about following changes in the objectives of Circle K:

To emphasize the advantages of the American way of life.
To provide educational opportunities for worthy young men.
To encourage participation in group activities.
To promote good fellowship and high scholarship.
To develop aggressive citizenship and the spirit of service for the improvement of all human relationships.
To afford useful training in the social graces and personality development.
To encourage and promote the following ideals:
To give primacy to the human and spiritual rather than to the material values of life.
To encourage the daily living of the Golden Rule in all human relationships.
To promote the adoption and the application of higher social, business, and professional standards.
To develop, by precept and example, a more intelligent, aggressive and serviceable citizenship.
To provide through Circle K Clubs, a practical means to form enduring friendships, to render altruistic service, and to build better communities.
To cooperate in creating and maintaining that sound public opinion and high idealism which make possible the increase of righteousness, justice, and patriotism and good will.
The motto of the organization became the same as that of Kiwanis International:   "We Build."

At the Kiwanis International Convention, held during May of 1954, an attempt was made by the Kiwanis Special Committee on Circle K Clubs to help Circle K gain recognition as an International organization. The attempt failed. However, a temporary Circle K organization was established as Circle K members prepared themselves for their first annual convention which was held October 17-19, 1954, at Carthage College.

One-hundred and fourteen members, representing 35 Circle K Clubs, attended the convention. After the elections, Eugene C. Alford, Jr., from Georgia Institute of Technology, was elected the second President of Circle K.

CSC explains plans for proposed Charger Center


By Joy Swearingen, Managing editor
Tuesday, July 29, 2008 4:38 PM CDT





 
Facing south on Buchanan Street/ Rt. 136, this is the proposed layout for the CSSC Charger Center.

 
Preliminary plans for a Charger Community Center have begun to put a dream into action.

In June Tom Schmidt, president of Carl Sandburg College, announced plans of a partnership working to build a performing arts, fitness/athletic center on property owned by Prairieland Investment Group, which was the former Carthage College.

The project would make use of the existing Bryan Auditorium and construct an attached gymnasium and fitness building.

“The quote from Carl Sandburg himself is, ‘Nothing happens, but first a dream,'” said John Huston of Carthage, Carl Sandburg board member.

“We articulated that dream. Now we have graphics and responsible estimates of the construction costs. We are pursuing the dream,” Schmidt said. He was in Carthage Thursday evening for a meeting of the college board held at the CSC Education Commons in Carthage.

Schmidt explained that two years ago at a retreat, the Carl Sandburg College board reaffirmed its commitment of pursuing partnerships with groups in the district.

“We pursued a partnership with the Prairieland Investment Group after they purchased the college. Nothing has changed hands, but I can say they are heartily onboard with the concept, and we spent quality time with other potential partners before going public,” Schmidt said.

Huston said all the partners are positive about the idea.

“No one, as a group or individual, has been negative. You eventually have these partners realize that the value to them will far exceed what they are putting in to it. We hope, as they look at the alternatives, it is the best option,” Huston said.

These other partners include the City of Carthage, the Carthage Park District in their affiliation with the Carthage Family Fitness, Illini West High School, Carthage Elementary School district and Western Illinois Economic Development Authority (WIEDA).

“Along with this we need a commitment from the members of the Hancock County community incorporated into this dream,” Schmidt said.

This idea is similar to the agreement between Carthage schools and Carl Sandburg College formed about 10 years ago when the education commons building was built.

“At that time Carl Sandburg fronted the money for the building, and used the lease agreements with the schools for their use of the building as collateral for the loan,” Schmidt said. “In this case none of these partners has enough of a need to create the facility on its own, but each has an ongoing, infrequent need for use of one or more parts of the dream.”

Plans include renovation of the auditorium and changing the entrance to a common shared area to the adjacent facilities. The two story classroom building, on the west side of the auditorium, known as Douglas Center, would be razed to make room for the gymnasium and fitness center. An area common to both facilities would connect the auditorium with the new construction.

Uses of the facility would include home athletic events of Carl Sandburg College and expanded performing arts curriculum and other events for the college. Carl Sandburg College offers a two-year associate degree in performing arts that can expand to a bachelors degree through the transfer agreement with Western Illinois University, Schmidt noted.

Other uses include athletic and performing arts events for Illini West High School and Carthage Elementary School; a more permanent home and facilities for the Carthage Family Fitness; conferences and fitness activities for employees and guests of Carthage Vet Center and Professional Swine Management; and other performing arts events, meetings and fitness activities in the community.

“We have one building with three primary functions all under one roof,” Schmidt said. “I do not anticipate much change to the look of the auditorium. We would have sensitivity to blend the new construction with what is already there, although it would not necessarily be made of brick.”

Preliminary estimates of the cost total $8.6 million on the low end to $9.4 million. Renovation of the auditorium would be $2.1 to $2.3 million.

“The cost of the rejuvenation looks high, but it would be much more to build a new auditorium from scratch,” Schmidt said. That work includes upgrades to the main floor and balcony, replacing seating, upgrading finishes, new restroom facilities, upgrading the stage, replacing heating and air-conditioning, upgrading electrical systems, and adding new fire protection.

“We anticipate a multi-pronged approach to funding,” Schmidt said. Low interest bonding from WIEDA is a possibility with private contributions, grants and eventual lease payments from project partners providing funds to repay the bonds. Pulling together the money from public and private sources takes time.

“We have a history of not letting time and money get in our way,” Schmidt said. “From the time we have the money, it could be 12 to 15 months from bidding until we could use the building.”

“There would also be a need for our community to step forward and help with the project,” Huston said.

Schmidt proposed that Prairieland Investment Group donate the auditorium building to Carl Sandburg College who would then, as owner of the building, become accountable for overseeing its construction, operation and scheduling.

For more information, contact Schmidt at 309/341-5213 or tschmidt@sandburg.edu.



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